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When released, Back to the Future became the most successful film of the year, grossing more than $380 million worldwide and receiving very positive reviews.

When released, Back to the Future became the most successful film of the year, grossing more than $380 million worldwide and receiving very positive reviews.


Character name of Emmett comes from the word “time,” spelled backwards and pronounced as syllables (em-it). His middle name is “Lathrop,” which is “portal” backwards, with an extra “h” inserted in the middle.

Character name of Emmett comes from the word “time,” spelled backwards and pronounced as syllables (em-it). His middle name is “Lathrop,” which is “portal” backwards, with an extra “h” inserted in the middle.


Christopher Lloyd based his performance as Doc Brown on a combination of physicist Albert Einstein and conductor Leopold Stokowski. Brown’s pronunciation of gigawatts as “jigowatts”, is based on the way a physicist whom Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale met with for research said the word.

Christopher Lloyd based his performance as Doc Brown on a combination of physicist Albert Einstein and conductor Leopold Stokowski. Brown’s pronunciation of gigawatts as “jigowatts”, is based on the way a physicist whom Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale met with for research said the word.


The inspiration for the film largely stems from Bob Gale discovering his father’s high school yearbook and wondering whether he would have been friends with his father as a teenager. Gale also said that if he had the chance to go back in time he would really go back and see if they would have been friends.

The inspiration for the film largely stems from Bob Gale discovering his father’s high school yearbook and wondering whether he would have been friends with his father as a teenager. Gale also said that if he had the chance to go back in time he would really go back and see if they would have been friends.


Michael J. Fox had always been the first choice for Marty, but he was unavailable due to scheduling conflicts with his work on Family Ties. As “Family Ties” co-star Meredith Baxter was pregnant at the time, Fox was carrying a lot more of the show than usual. The show’s producer Gary David Goldberg simply couldn’t afford to let Fox go. Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale then cast Eric Stoltz as Marty based on his performance in Mask. After four weeks of filming Zemeckis and Gale felt that Stoltz wasn’t right for the part and Stoltz agreed. By this stage, Baxter was back fully on the show and Goldberg agreed to let Fox go off to make the film. Fox worked out a schedule to fulfill his commitment to both projects. Every day during production, he drove straight to the movie set after taping of the show was finished every day and averaged about five hours of sleep. The bulk of the production was filmed from 6pm to 6am, with the daylight scenes filmed on weekends. Fox found it exhausting, but “it was my dream to be in the film and television business, although I didn’t know I’d be in them simultaneously. It was just this weird ride and I got on.” Zemeckis concurred, dubbing Back to the Future “the film that would not wrap.” He recalled that because they shot night after night, he was always “half asleep” and the “fattest, most out-of-shape and sick I ever was.”

Michael J. Fox had always been the first choice for Marty, but he was unavailable due to scheduling conflicts with his work on Family Ties. As “Family Ties” co-star Meredith Baxter was pregnant at the time, Fox was carrying a lot more of the show than usual. The show’s producer Gary David Goldberg simply couldn’t afford to let Fox go. Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale then cast Eric Stoltz as Marty based on his performance in Mask. After four weeks of filming Zemeckis and Gale felt that Stoltz wasn’t right for the part and Stoltz agreed. By this stage, Baxter was back fully on the show and Goldberg agreed to let Fox go off to make the film. Fox worked out a schedule to fulfill his commitment to both projects. Every day during production, he drove straight to the movie set after taping of the show was finished every day and averaged about five hours of sleep. The bulk of the production was filmed from 6pm to 6am, with the daylight scenes filmed on weekends. Fox found it exhausting, but “it was my dream to be in the film and television business, although I didn’t know I’d be in them simultaneously. It was just this weird ride and I got on.” Zemeckis concurred, dubbing Back to the Future “the film that would not wrap.” He recalled that because they shot night after night, he was always “half asleep” and the “fattest, most out-of-shape and sick I ever was.”


Robert Zemeckis decided to leave out several planned effects shots. One shot in particular involved Forrest running into Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his supporters. Forrest distracts several dogs trying to attack King and his supporters by playing fetch with them and rendering them harmless to King and himself as well as his supporters.

Robert Zemeckis decided to leave out several planned effects shots. One shot in particular involved Forrest running into Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his supporters. Forrest distracts several dogs trying to attack King and his supporters by playing fetch with them and rendering them harmless to King and himself as well as his supporters.


During the ping-pong matches, there was no ball; it was entirely CGI, animated to meet the actors’ paddles.

During the ping-pong matches, there was no ball; it was entirely CGI, animated to meet the actors’ paddles.


The line, “My name is Forrest Gump. People call me Forrest Gump,” was ad libbed by Tom Hanks while filming the scene and director Robert Zemeckis liked it so much that he decided to keep it in.

The line, “My name is Forrest Gump. People call me Forrest Gump,” was ad libbed by Tom Hanks while filming the scene and director Robert Zemeckis liked it so much that he decided to keep it in.


The park bench that Tom Hanks sat on for much of the movie was located in historic Savannah, Georgia, at Chippewa Square. The fiberglass bench he sat on, since then, has been removed and placed into a museum to avoid being destroyed by bad weather, or possibly stolen. To this day, the bench is held in the Savannah History Museum, Savannah, Georgia.

The park bench that Tom Hanks sat on for much of the movie was located in historic Savannah, Georgia, at Chippewa Square. The fiberglass bench he sat on, since then, has been removed and placed into a museum to avoid being destroyed by bad weather, or possibly stolen. To this day, the bench is held in the Savannah History Museum, Savannah, Georgia.


Tom Hanks signed onto the film after an hour and a half of reading the script but agreed to take the role only on the condition that the film was historically accurate. He initially wanted to ease Forrest’s pronounced Southern accent, but was eventually persuaded by director Robert Zemeckis to portray the heavy accent stressed in the novel and patterned his accent after Michael Conner Humphreys (young Forrest) who actually spoke that way.

Tom Hanks signed onto the film after an hour and a half of reading the script but agreed to take the role only on the condition that the film was historically accurate. He initially wanted to ease Forrest’s pronounced Southern accent, but was eventually persuaded by director Robert Zemeckis to portray the heavy accent stressed in the novel and patterned his accent after Michael Conner Humphreys (young Forrest) who actually spoke that way.